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    Parvoviral infection

    Canine parvovirus is a highly contagious viral disease of dogs that commonly causes acute gastrointestinal illness in puppies. The disease most often strikes in pups between six and 20 weeks old, but older animals are sometimes also affected.

    The virus causes this destruction by targeting the epithelium of the small intestine, the lining that helps to absorb nutrients and provides a crucial barrier against fluid loss and bacterial invasion from the gut into the body.

    By preventing the replacement of old and dying cells with fresh new cells, the virus leaves the intestinal surface unable to adequately absorb nutrients, prevent fluid loss into the stool, or prevent bacteria from moving from the gut into the body.Severe diarrhea and nausea are the initial result, and widespread infection inside the body and death could occur if left untreated.
    Like the feline parvovirus, canine parvovirus is also highly resistant to physical factors and chemical substances. Among common disinfectants, only hypochlorite is effective in eliminating parvovirus.
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    Feline panleukopenia is a highly contagious viral disease of cats caused by the feline parvovirus. Kittens are most severely affected by the virus. The feline parvovirus infects and kills cells that are rapidly growing and dividing, such as those in the bone marrow, intestines, and the developing fetus. Hemorrhagic enteritis often occurs as a consequence of feline panleukopenia virus infection.

    Feline parvovirus is non-enveloped and highly resistant to physical factors and chemical substances. Among common disinfectants, only hypochlorite is effective in eliminating parvovirus.
    In contaminated environments, it may remain infectious for weeks or even months. Diseased animals shed virus at high titers (up to 109 TCID50 per gram of feces), and virus quickly accumulates in affected shelters and catteries.
    As it is highly contagious, susceptible animals may still become infected, even after a seemingly thorough disinfection of the premises. Breeding catteries and rescue shelters are particularly at risk.

    A cat showing clinical signs of feline panleukopenia, substantiated by laboratory evidence should be kept in isolation. Even cats with an indoor lifestyle cannot always avoid encountering the virus, since it is so stable in the environment and can be transmitted on fomites.

    The Astéria Parvovirus tests offer users the flexibility in their choice of sampling by including primers for feline and canine in the same endogenous control. The user could thus choose to test feline or canine blood using the blood kit and feline or canine feces using the fecal kit.